raisethestorm

20yr old. Saulteaux. Scott. Gunn. Sicilian. Living in Regina, Saskatchewan.

4478

"I’m starting to understand the real failings of multi-cultural education growing up in K-12 schools. We gave everyone access to the “fun” parts of culture. Let’s sing the dreidel song! Now we understand the Jewish experience. Let’s talk about segregation. Wasn’t that wrong. Aren’t we glad it’s over? Let’s take turns reading parts of the “I Have a Dream” speech. We had access to the easy stuff without having to really examine the hard stuff. And we were giving easy access to things that aren’t “ours” and shouldn’t be “ours.” So you can’t just pick up the “fun” stuff and put it into your party theme or Facebook pictures. I’m using simple terms like fun because that’s how multiculturalism was given to us as children. And while it may have served a purpose at the time, it gave us too much access to claim things that aren’t ours.

I honestly, honestly think that is some of the reasons why the race parties are such a horrible fad on college campuses. They are carrying on what we did in elementary school. Let’s make culture a party! Everyone bring your cultural food and put on a costume! The racism is present and good percentage of the participants are really expressing deep rooted racism. But some truly don’t want to “understand why it’s wrong” when they are re-enacting what we used to do with culture in elementary schools. Culture was supposed to be fun. “I don’t understand why you are mad now? I thought culture was a party!” Party’s over kids. Put down the head-dress."

- Brian Henry (via theteej)

(via frijoliz)

4853

"The whole culture is telling you to hurry, while the art tells you to take your time. Always listen to the art."

-

Junot Díaz (via kamara)

need to remind myself of this everyday 

(via kalisherni)

(via baapi-makwa)

12624

"Developing the ability to piss other people off (or even to RISK pissing them off) without knuckling under is pretty much the Holy Grail of emotionally abused kids, I think. We are programmed to respond at the first sign of displeasure, and we don’t have the faith in ourselves and our decisions to weather the storm– or even a mild sprinkle– so we tend to freak out as if the world was ending if a cloud crosses the sun. We freak out about the possibility that we’re wrong, that we’re doing the wrong things, that we’re making the wrong choices, that we’ll make someone angry, because there’s this awful certainty lurking at the back of our minds that says “If you do the wrong thing, you will be in TROUBLE.” And being in TROUBLE is the worst thing, ever, because that part of our brain is forever three years old where our parents are our whole world and being in TROUBLE is the end of everything.

It takes a lot of practice to gain that sort of gut-level knowledge that we’re strong enough to handle this stuff and that the world doesn’t end if someone else is angry at us. It’s not an innate quality that some people have and some don’t; people who grow up in non-abusive homes learn it when they’re young, is all, and the rest of us have to learn it when we’re grown up. And it sucks, and it’s not fair, and it’s not fun, but there’s no getting around it, and you can do it, you CAN.

You can piss people off.

You can be wrong.

You can fuck up.

You can do stuff that everyone thinks is weird.

AND IT IS ALL OKAY. The world won’t end. You will still be a good person. And the likelihood is that most of the things you do WON’T be wrong, and WON’T piss people off, and WON’T be up-fuckery, and WON’T be weird, but if it is? The hell with it; fix it, if necessary, and move on."

85

I am a Person that opposes the Keystone XL Pipeline.

the-people-of:

Does this statement apply to you? Reblog it and be counted. More information here.

(via bedelia-bloodyknuckle)

7003

"You have to act as if it were possible to radically transform the world. And you have to do it all the time."

- Angela Davis - from a lecture delivered at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. February 13th, 2014. (via ninjaruski)

(via cultureofresistance)

3

Distinguished Storytellers Festival

sakewewak-artists-collective:

First held in 2001 as the Distinguished Storytellers Series, the Storytellers Festival has evolved into an annual multidisciplinary festival that presents a diverse array of renowned storytellers, artists, and academics from around the world, who engage our audiences in contemporary cultural expression, thought and dialogue derived from our oral traditions.

506

7 American Indian Women Novelists You Have to Read

nitanahkohe:

here’s the list, but be sure to check out the link for bios!

  • Debra Magpie Earling (Salish & Kootenai)
  • Linda LeGarde Grover (Bois Forte Band of Ojibwe)
  • Linda Hogan (Chickasaw)
  • Sara Sue Hoklotubbe (Cherokee)
  • LeAnne Howe (Choctaw)
  • Evelina Zuni Lucero (Isleta/Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo)
  • Lee Maracle (Sto:loh)

I’d also add Lois Beardslee (Ojibwe) & Margo Tamez (Apache)!